Author Archive

New peds HO guide

Posted: June 6, 2013 by gerardloh in Paediatrics

Dear friends,

I have completed my latest peds HO Guide. Again, it is an early version which requires proof reading. Kindly assist me in this and correct me if I am wrong.

May this collection help you in your pediatrics posting. Will add on more topics when time permits in the near future. Right now, I’m off to A and E! Cheers

Additional notes by Dr Goh Kiam Seong

pedsho

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Surgical HO Guide

Posted: February 17, 2013 by gerardloh in Surgery

Dear friends and fellow colleagues,

I compiled a new surgical guide, however it is not as complete as I like it to be as Surgical was quite an eventful posting, I was rather busy till the end. I have now moved on to my 5th posting…hence I doubt I’ d have any time to check and update it anytime soon. Nevertheless, I’m sharing it and hopefully it may be of some help. Will update it again once I’m free. Do let me know if there are any mistakes or things to add on. Thanks!

hoguide

The “gangnam” cartoon is in celebration of the Surgical Night, memories which will remain with me for a long time to come. Not to forget the lion dance. Thank you General Surgery Hospital Ampang! My favourite posting so far.

DSC_0231

Gong Xi Fa Chai!

New medical HO guide (unedited version)

Posted: November 3, 2012 by gerardloh in Medicine

Dear friends,

I have completed the compilation of my medical HO guide. However, in view that Medical is such a wide field, I have not included quite a number of topics as yet.

Hopefully, in the near future, I will be able to add on to the list of topics, including procedures.

This compilation is not yet reviewed by any Medical officers or specialists and may contain unavoidable errors.

For now, I hope this compilation will be able to assist you in your daily work as a medical HO.

Dedicated to all my mentors and staff at Hospital Ampang.


click on image to download the book

NEW O & G guide

Posted: June 22, 2012 by gerardloh in O & G

The O & G HO guide is now available for download!

This compilation is just a quick reference, more coverage in HOW O & G guide part 1.

Special thanks to Dr Liew Nyan Chin for helping me with this book.

Hopefully this book will help you in your early days as an O&G Houseman. Do let me know if there are any mistakes or if you have any additional input to share.  I will then upload an updated 2nd version in the near future.

Good Luck! O&G was indeed a fun posting with lots of practical work. Enjoy!

 

 

Click on image to download book.

 

 

Dear friends,

The orthopedics guide is now available for download.

UPDATED VERSION APRIL 2012

click on image to download PDF file

However, most of the notes are based on my experience while working in Ampang Hospital, and may vary in your own healthcare centre.

Hopefully it may serve as a guide for your Orthopedic posting!

Good Luck for your next posting!

Ankle Block

Posted: January 3, 2012 by gerardloh in Orthopaedics & Traumatology

An ankle block is essentially a block of the terminal branches of the sciatic nerve. It is useful to think of the ankle block as the block of

two deep nerves

1. posterior tibial and

2. deep peroneal nerves

three superficial nerves

1. saphenous

2. sural

3. superficial peroneal
This concept is crucial for the success of the block, because the two deep nerves are anesthetized by injecting local anesthetic underneath the superficial fascia, whereas the three superficial nerves are anesthetized by a simple subcutaneous injection of local anesthetic.

Deep nerves
1. Deep peroneal block

The finger of the palpating hand is positioned in the groove just lateral to the extensor hallucis longus. The needle is inserted under the skin and advanced until stopped by the bone. At this point, the needle is withdrawn back 1-2 mm and 2-3 mL of local anesthetic is injected.  A “fan” technique is recommended to increase the success rate.

2. Post tibial block

Posterior tibial nerve is anesthetized by injecting local anesthetic just behind the medial malleolus.
Facing the medial aspect of the foot, the needle is introduced in the groove behind the medial malleolus and advanced until contact with the bone is felt. At this point, the needle is withdrawn back 1-2 mm and 2-3 mL of local anesthetic is injected.


Spf nerves


1. Spf peroneal nerves

Superficial peroneal nerve is blocked by subcutaneous infiltration of local anesthetic over the lateral aspect of the foot.


2.Sural nerve

 

3 Saphenous nerve

Saphenous nerve is blocked by subcutaneous infiltration of local anesthetic over the medial as pect of the foot.



Ortho stuff

Posted: December 18, 2011 by gerardloh in Orthopaedics & Traumatology

It’s your first posting…you’re in the procedure room assisting your MO for the 1st time..
suddenly she yells..

MO: “Get me some orthoban, 3 rolls of POP…and some crepe bandage “

You: OMG..What buns? pee…and what crap??
 

To prevent such encounters, pls take some time to learn some basic apparatus used in Orthopaedics!

 

1. Orthoban

2. Crepe bandage

 

3. Plaster of paris

 

4. Plaster saw (aint no vacuum cleaner)

 

4. Zimmer splint

5.  Thomas splint (lateral traction)
 

6. Plaster spreader

cutter (stout scissors)

 

surgical instruments